HLS-615 Domestic and Global Intelligence for Security Management

This course acquaints students with several concepts and practices that are necessary for collecting, analyzing, and evaluating intelligence and managing the intelligence as a function. It also explores the influence of intelligence on shaping homeland security executive decision making at the international, federal, state, and local levels. This course examines the structures, roles, and interactions of the foreign and domestic intelligence communities, the intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities of criminal justice and private sector entities, and the use of intelligence processes to support homeland security investigations, planning, and policy formulation. Through the study of current and past homeland security events, students in this course will develop an understanding of the intelligence tradecraft, analytic, and research skills required for intelligence work. This course also explores the ethical, Constitutional, and civil liberties issues associated with the collection of information by homeland security agencies. Also examined are topics related to assessing the reliability and validity of information, intelligence sharing, and covert and counterintelligence operations of domestic and international intelligence agencies.

Credits: 3

Offered in Oct 2020, Apr 2021

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