Master of Science in Management Course Descriptions

Core Coursestop of page

EIO-520: Economic Issues in Organizations (3 credits)
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This course explores the complex relationship of strategic economic issues within an organization and the organization's interaction with other firms in the industry. The course begins with a brief overview of the basic economics of the firm and uses those principles to drive an analysis of the firm's activities and interactions with other firms. The course examines different market structures to see how overall economic structure affects decision making and interactions; this basic structure will be used to analyze competition with other firms in obtaining resources, setting prices to maximize profits, and reacting to decisions of competitors. The course also examines methodologies for evaluating results and explores ways to use that analysis in making future decisions.
FAM-540: Finance and Accounting for Managers (3 credits)
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This course is designed to provide the non-accountant and non-financial manager with the knowledge necessary to interact with professionals from those disciplines. The majority of the material draws from the theory and practice of financial management. Sufficient accounting background is provided to enable the student to understand and work with information provided by accounting and finance professionals. Emphasis is placed on understanding terms, concepts, and uses of information provided by these functions rather than on the actual performance of the calculations.

Advisory: Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel is required.
HRM-530: Human Resources Management (3 credits)
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This course examines the role of the human resource professional as a strategic partner in managing today's organizations. Key functions such as recruitment, selection, development, appraisal, retention, compensation, and labor relations are examined. Implications of legal and global environments are appraised and current issues such as diversity training, sexual harassment policies, and rising benefit costs are analyzed. Best practices of employers of choice are considered.
MKM-560: Marketing Management (3 credits)
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This course is an in-depth survey of marketing. The flow of goods and services between consumers and marketing organizations, marketing environments, competitive markets, and factors are examined. Specific attention is given to market identification and segmentation, target market selection, strategic planning along with implementation and evaluation, the nature and development of products, pricing, distribution, and promotion.
ORG-502: Leadership and Management in the 21st Century (3 credits)
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In this course, students explore, expand, and improve their personal and practical approach to leadership and management. The course is designed to allow students to analyze major theories and models of leadership, evaluate the effectiveness of these theories in a practical context, and apply various leadership approaches through a case study format. Students also examine, model, and adapt their own personal style and ethics for real-world practical applications.
ORR-510: Organizational Research (3 credits)
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This course equips students to conduct the types of research and information-gathering projects that are a significant part of the organizational competitiveness, success, and growth. The course provides techniques and skills that students can apply in researching many types of questions and problems, including those encountered in other graduate-level courses as well as the degree Capstone.

Note: This course must be taken one to two terms prior to Capstone (academic advisor approval must be obtained prior to registration).
PJM-510: Project Management (3 credits)
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This course introduces project management from the standpoint of a manager who must organize, plan, implement, and control tasks to achieve an organization's schedule, budget, and performance objectives. Tools and concepts such as project charter, scope statement, work breakdown structure, project estimating, and scheduling methodologies are studied. Students will practice with Microsoft Project software to be able to manage a project from start to deployment. What is a project? How is it managed? What is the best approach? This is an opportunity to learn the project management fundamentals that can guide a project through a maze of challenges to successful completion. Successful projects do not occur by luck or by chance. In fact, many projects do not achieve their organization's goals.

Core Advanced Level Coursestop of page

MAN-630: Management Capstone (3 credits)
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Candidates for completion of the Master of Science in Management (MSM), Master of Science in Healthcare Management (MSHCM), or the Master of Human Resources Management (MSHRM) degree will complete an independent project demonstrating their conceptual, analytical, research, and practical management skills achieved through the courses in either program. The project, called a Capstone because it represents a crowning achievement much as a capstone does in architecture, is a 3-credit, one-term requirement that is completed at the end of the program. It is a closely supervised experience resulting in a paper that demonstrates the student's ability to synthesize and utilize the skills and knowledge students have gained in previous courses in the MSHRM, MSHCM, or MSM programs.

Prerequisites: This course requires completion of ORR-510: Organizational Research. Students may not take ORR-510 and the Management Capstone during the same term.

Note: This is the last course taken to complete the degree program (academic advisor approval must be obtained prior to registration).
MSM-620: Leading Strategic Change (3 credits)
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Managing organizational change is challenging at the best of times. In today's dynamic fast-paced global environment, change is a constant component of organizational life. Whether the change is simple or complex, organizations must constantly change or die. Leaders need to act as change agents to envision necessary change and effectively lead an organization through a change initiative. This course prepares participants to lead change within a variety of organizational settings. Models for the creation and communication of change plans are examined to develop an understanding of the specific challenges associated with change. The theory and methods for effective implementation of change plans are used to examine the practical realities of change implementation in modern organizations.

Electivestop of page

ACC-501: Principles of Forensic Accounting (3 credits)
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This course provides a solid foundation for building skills in forensic accounting techniques, including gathering, interpreting, and documenting evidence. Students examine the investigative techniques used by accountants to conduct forensic examinations as well as the common schemes and techniques used to commit fraud. The skills acquired in this course will enable students to assist businesses in detecting, investigating, documenting, and preventing fraud. The course also introduces the many professional opportunities available to forensic accountants.

Advisory: Students considering enrolling in this graduate course should have a thorough understanding of the business transaction cycle and, at a minimum, a background in both financial accounting and auditing, obtained through either prior course work or professional experience. Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel is required.
ACC-601: Intermediate Accounting III (3 credits)
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This course discusses accounting for investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions and postretirement benefits, and leases. The course also covers principles involved in accounting for changes of various types as well as for correction of errors. This course will also summarize the preparation of statements of cash flows as well as full disclosure in financial reporting. Throughout, the course will analyze the impact of international accounting standards on accounting issues. The material makes references to both the U.S. Accounting Standards issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

Advisory: Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel is required.
ACC-602: Advanced Accounting (3 credits)
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Advanced Accounting provides valuable information about accounting for home office and branches, business combinations and consolidations. Also, the course focuses on concepts and techniques of accounting for partnerships and foreign currency transactions. The course provides various techniques for solving some of the more complex problems in the business environment.

Advisory: Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel is required.
ACC-603: Accounting Theory (3 credits)
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This course studies the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as they affect today's practitioners. The course emphasis is on accounting conceptual framework and philosophy that includes income, liability, and asset valuation based on inductive, deductive, and capital market approaches. The course also surveys price-level changes, monetary and nonmonetary factors, problems of ownership equities, and the disclosure of relevant information to investors and creditors.

Advisory: Working knowledge of Microsoft Excel is required.
CSR-610: Corporate Social Responsibility (3 credits)
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This course introduces students to the concept of corporate social responsibility, which involves an examination of whether organizations should expand their focus from serving stockholders to also considering the impact of the firm's activities on diverse stakeholders. Practicing corporate social responsibility requires that a corporation meld business goals with societal expectations. To do so means addressing complex questions such as: What obligations do businesses have to the societies in which they operate? Can the interests of corporations and their outside stakeholders be aligned or are they in inherent conflict? This course examines these and other questions without prescribing simple solutions.
ETH-590: Ethics for Managers (3 credits)
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Successful business practice is firmly grounded in ethics. This course introduces students to foundational principles in ethics for business and life. Students will explore ethics from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Ethics for Managers provides the opportunity for students to critically analyze and evaluate their own views, as well as those of others, in order to develop solid approaches to challenging dilemmas. Significant debates and methodologies in business will be explored.
GLM-550: Global Management (3 credits)
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This course examines the issues and challenges facing managers in a global business context. Specifically, the course explores and analyzes international aspects of organizational behavior, human resource management, labor relations, corporate strategy, and political risk. In doing so, the course covers both micro-level topics (for example, cross-cultural communication) and macro-level considerations (for example, formulation of international strategy).
HRM-540: Lifestyle Benefits and Compensation in The New Millennium (3 credits)
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This course examines both the theory and practice of total compensation. Topics include strategic compensation, employee compensation and benefits, job evaluation, external competitiveness and market analysis, incentives and variable pay, employee motivation, compensation administration, and the compensation of special groups. A variety of approaches are employed to examine organizational compensation policy and design. Consideration is given to the interaction between human resource managers and managers throughout the organization in order to realize effective compensation programs. This course balances theory and practice. There will be many opportunities to apply compensation theory in required weekly discussions and in both the individual and group projects. The course will emphasize the strategic aspects of compensation and how the organization can achieve a sustainable competitive advantage through compensation policy/programs. By the end of this course, students should have a very in-depth understanding of how to establish, organize, and administer an effective and equitable compensation system.
HRM-550: Strategic Recruitment and Selection (3 credits)
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Regardless of industry, business unit, or department, people are every organization's key source of competitive advantage. In the war for talent, organizations have two choices: develop strategic human resources (HR) systems that support the recruitment and selection of highly qualified employees, or hire employees with a poor fit, draining organizational resources and resulting in poor outcomes. Not only is recruiting the right people a difficult and daunting task, but selecting the best organizational fit is a significant challenge. Organizations must design a recruitment and selection process from a strategic perspective to successfully win the talent war. This course will focus on the best practices of strategic HR planning. Throughout the course students will be introduced to successful recruitment and selection programs and methods that can be adapted to any organization.
HRM-560: The Entrepreneurial Organization: Learning as Competitive Advantage (3 credits)
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This course explores three key concepts and best practices associated with cultivating entrepreneurial behavior within organizations. Integrating adult learning, organizational learning, and knowledge management are central to adapting entrepreneurial behaviors and practices. In this course, students will consider the necessity of understanding adult learning theory to create a culture that supports entrepreneurial behavior. Students will also consider the importance of organizational learning and knowledge management on enabling stakeholders to adopt entrepreneurial orientations and practices, and they will apply these orientations and practices toward advancing entrepreneurialism in the workplace. Finally, students will identify the theoretical and practical intersection points among these topics and analyze the importance of adult learning, organizational learning, and knowledge management on promoting an entrepreneurial organization.
HRM-570: The Effectiveness of a Market-Connected Culture (3 credits)
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This course includes a critical examination of how human resource professionals can participate in creating and maintaining an effective organization that responds to the marketplace and services its customers effectively. Emphasis is placed on the internal and external cultures and environments, the emergence of a knowledge economy, and the importance of intellectual capital.
HRM-600: Managing the Human Resources Enterprise (3 credits)
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The profession of human resource management (HRM) has become a major strategic partner with senior management and as a proactive consultant with operational managers within many organizations. Assuming these roles has increased the credibility of human resource management as a key component to enhance the effectiveness and productivity of employees within contemporary organizations. As important as these proactive interventions for HRM professionals, it is also critical for HRM to have an enterprise perspective. Through research and analysis, this course will assess the contemporary research in the field of HRM and examine the ways that HRM incorporates greater efficiency and effectiveness in responding to the challenges facing human resources and organizations. This course will analyze and assess important HRM functions and programs that include social media, technology, risk management, talent management, diversity workforce, retention management, employee engagement, organizational branding, and delivery models.
HRM-610: Human Resources as a Strategic Partner (3 credits)
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Managing strategically is a complex, rational, well thought out sequence of activities and approaches that addresses the various competitive challenges organizations face. Human resource management faces a series of challenges and opportunities to be regarded as a strategic partner with other senior leadership executives. One manner in which to accomplish this is to earn a seat as a partner during the strategic planning process. There are many roadblocks, however, on the road to becoming an organizational partner, which results in frustration, resentment, confusion, and possibly a regression back to maintaining nothing more than an administrative function. A key, however, to the successful acceleration of human resources showing they can add value is by gaining critical information from the voices of the organization's customers and integrating these into a roadmap that will take human resources from the role of "caretaker" to "organizational leader." All of the human resource management functions must be implemented and maintained with a strategic focus. It is not only considering the present challenges but also planning for future developments that will have an impact on the organization. This course will focus upon those critical elements that will help turn human resources away from "paper pushing" and toward a value added facilitator of strategic change.
HRM-620: The Legal and Ethical Environment of Human Resources (3 credits)
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This course provides a careful examination of the significant ethical and legal issues facing the human resource professional. While there is a focus on employment law, there is an equally strong consideration of ethical issues, which human resource personnel must address and share with other decision makers in the organization.
LCO-610: Leading Change in Complex Organizations (3 credits)
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This course focuses on organizational change and examines the importance of change, how change agents can work with others to affect meaningful change in organizations, and why change will become increasingly significant to organizations in the future. Students will examine and apply a change process that provides them with an opportunity to think about change, to reflect on stories of individuals who have changed their organizations, and to put learning into practice in current organizational settings.
OML-610: Organizational Management and Leadership I (3 credits)
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This course presents a comprehensive, integrative, and practical focus on leadership and management. It is based upon a framework that analyzes leadership and management at different levels: individual leadership, team leadership, and organizational leadership. The course presents leadership and management theories/concepts that have emerged over the past several decades. In addition, students will survey contemporary perspectives on ethics, networking, coaching, organizational culture, diversity, learning organizations, strategic leadership, and crisis leadership. Special attention will be paid on examining the role that leaders play in identifying and implementing change in organizations."Note: This course builds upon ORG-502: Leadership and Management in the 21st Century, although that course is not a prerequisite to OML-610. While there is some overlap in content between the two, OML-610 has a far greater emphasis on application and skill development than ORG-502. "
OML-620: Organizational Management and Leadership II (3 credits)
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This course focuses on how skills and abilities in leadership and management can be developed and applied by individuals in order to make a difference in organizations, communities, or societies. The course looks first at exemplary leaders, both those who are well known and national or international in their scope (e.g., Robert Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Bill Clinton, Mohandas Gandhi) and those who are not well known (e.g., everyday people who have exercised moral leadership or community leadership), all with special consideration of the moral aspects of effective leadership in several different contexts. It then looks at how individuals can develop leadership and act with authenticity, integrity, and creativity, all with special consideration of exercising leadership as a 'whole person' who must balance responsibilities to home, work, and community. Ultimately, the course is intended to help students become more effective leaders in contexts where they currently serve or in contexts to which they aspire. The course is based in the belief that leadership involves moral/ethical dimensions and that effective leadership equals good leadership; that is, that it includes service to others and to contexts beyond the self as well as qualities such as authenticity and integrity.

Note: This course builds upon ORG-502: Leadership and Management in the 21st Century, although that course is not a prerequisite to OML-620. While there is some overlap in content between the two, OML-620 has a far greater emphasis on application and skill development than ORG-502.
OML-630: Contemporary Issues in Leadership (3 credits)
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This course focuses on compelling issues in leadership theory and practice. It is intended to present students with some of the latest and most innovative thinking about leadership and to promote practical insights for leadership within work and community settings. The course encourages students to look beyond embedded leadership ideas and practices and to consider leadership more broadly. Students cover the topics of leaders and followers (toxic leadership), men and women (gender in leadership), and individuals and teams (team leadership). Students are invited to rethink their orientation to leadership and human interaction and to apply their learning to a real-world setting.

Note: This course follows naturally from the foundations laid in OML-610: Organizational Management and Leadership I and in OML-620: Organizational Management and Leadership II. The three courses together form a logical sequence that moves from a general exploration of theory and practice in OML-610, to a focus on leading and managing self in OML-620 and, finally, to a focus on contemporary leadership issues in OML-630: Contemporary Issues in Leadership. While these courses present a comprehensive look at management, OML-610 and OML-620 are not prerequisites for OML-630, which can be taken as an individual course that provides exploration and focus on contemporary leadership issues and practices.
PJM-520: Project Leadership and Communication (3 credits)
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This course provides leadership and management guidelines for the project manager in a variety of situations. Principles of effective planning, communication, and motivation throughout the project life cycle are the focus of this course. Project Leadership and Communication presents principles of project control from initiation through execution to closure in a clear and practical manner.

Advisory: Students should have successfully completed PJM-510: Project Management before beginning this course.
PJM-530: Project Risk Management (3 credits)
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This course addresses identifying, analyzing, and responding to project risk in order to maximize results of positive events and minimize the consequences of adverse events. Identification, quantification, response planning, and control are covered. Risk factors, contract types, assessment techniques, tools to quantify risk, and procedures to reduce threats to project objectives and contingency are covered.

Advisory: Students should have successfully completed PJM-510: Project Management and PJM-520: Project Leadership and Communication before beginning this course.
PJM-540: Procurement and Vendor Management (3 credits)
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This course examines the processes and techniques through which goods and services are acquired in the project management environment. Course topics include: contract and procurement strategies; legal issues; contract pricing alternatives; technical, management and commercial requirements; RFP development; source selection; invitations to bid and bid evaluation; risk assessment; and contract negotiation and administration.
PJM-640: Global Project Management (3 credits)
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This course examines project management in a variety of global business settings. Included are project management methodologies and processes as well as culture, team building, and behavior management in a global context. Project management is examined as a set of best practices aimed at managing the total enterprise. Through a project management approach, corporate and organizational strategies are translated into project-level, value-adding elements of a company's project portfolio. This course will focus on the five global project management frameworks: global teams; global communication; global organizations; collaborative tools; and collaborative techniques.

Advisory: Students should have successfully completed PJM-510: Project Management, PJM-520: Project Leadership and Communication, and PJM-530: Project Risk Management before beginning this course.
SOE-570: Social Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
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This course focuses on the emerging field of social entrepreneurship, an application of for-profit entrepreneurship skills to ventures that focus on nonprofit mission and social value. It offers practical information for individuals in the field as well as innovative methods of conceptualizing the search for new and better ways to support and invest in social value. This course presents a framework for understanding this new sector of the economy, proven business skill sets adapted for the nonprofit environment, application tools for the field and advice for avoiding common pitfalls. It also spotlights specific implementation activities designed to monitor performance and provide various constituencies including donor-investors with measurable results, accountability indicators, and overall return on investment.